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March 2018 AD


Trumpian Pardons


Pardon of
Kristian Saucier

Pardon for Krisian Saucier

Pardon of
Sholom Rubashkin

Pardon of Sholom Rubashkin

We now have 4 forms of Trumpian pardons:
  1.   Hillary Clinton, target of Trump's "Lock Her Up" campaign
  1.   Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Trump's staunchest supporter
  1.   Kristian Saucier, sailor in the US Navy
  1.   Sholom Rubashkin, a Jewish kosher meatpacking executive
How are they related?

How are they different?

One way they are related is that each and every one serves Trump's agenda.

President Trump's pardons are strategically and politically placed to please EVERYONE!!!!

The first one and the last one are the startling pardons.

Trumpian Pardon #1:

Hillary Clinton should no doubt be locked up for the rest of her life; and yet, while technically not a pardon, our beloved President Donald Trump gave Hillary something even better than a pardon -- no prosecution at all for her multiple crimes at all.  No prosecution, no conviction, no need for a pardon.

Serves Trump's image with the PRO-SWAMP, ANTI-MAGA Crowd.

Trumpian Pardon #2:

Sheriff Joe Arpaio was a staunch Trump supporter. He famously exposed Barack Obama's birth certificate as a total fraud. So he was brought up on bogus charges. Joe never served any time and was Pardoned by Trump before sentencing could be announced.

Serves Trump's image with the ANTI-SWAMP, PRO-MAGA crowd.

Trump gave his first pardon in August to political ally and anti-illegal immigration hardliner Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Maricopa County, Ariz., who was awaiting sentencing for criminal contempt for allegedly ignoring a federal judge's order.

Trumpian Pardon #3:

While advocating on the campaign trail that Hillary should be locked up, Trump was well aware of the situation of the sailor who took a selfie which landed him in federal prision for a year. Trump campaigned on poor sailor Kristian Saucier. And yet, he was forced to finish his one year sentence in a federal penitentiary  7 months into Trump's Presidency.  Had to work as a  garbage truck driver  for another  6 months because of his felony conviction that was the only job he could get.

Serves Trump's image with his core MILITARY SUPPORT crowd.

President Trump issued the second pardon of his presidency Friday to former Navy sailor Kristian Saucier, who learned the news while driving a garbage truck, the only job he could find with a felony conviction.

Saucier was sentenced to a year in prison during the 2016 campaign for taking pictures inside a nuclear submarine. Trump invoked his case repeatedly on the campaign trail, saying he was “ruined” for doing “nothing” compared to Hillary Clinton.

Still, Trump allowed Saucier to serve his full prison sentence. He was released in September and returned to the Vermont home he shares with his wife Sadie and their two-year-old daughter.

Trumpian Pardon #4:

The last and most important pardon for this website, actually a very rare clemency,  by our beloved President was the pardon of Sholom Rubashkin by the commutation of his prison sentence. This poor innocent Jewish businessman was serving 27-years in a federal prison, guilty only of helping bring healthy Kosher food to poor fellow persecuted Jews. In a complete miscarriage of justice, this poor Jewish owner of a Kosher meatpacking plant called Agriprocessors was accused of only a few minor jay-walking-style crimes:

  1.   Not charged with hiring 800-1200 illegal aliens
  2.   Not charged with document fraud in accepting their employment papers
  3.   Not charged with violation of child labor laws
  4.   Charged with bank fraud
  5.   Charged with cheated the bank out of $26 million dollars
  6.   Charged with money laundering
  7.   Convicted and upheld on appeal on 86 federal counts
  8.   Engaged in influence peddling by his Jewish tribe to obtain his pardon.
Serves Trump's image  PRO-SWAMP, ANTI-MAGA, JEWISH DONORS.

Trump's other use of clemency came in December, when he gave a prison commutation to Sholom Rubashkin, a kosher meatpacking executive whose fraud sentence was decried as unjust by many former officials. Rubashkin's crime was discovered after his business was busted employing nearly 400 illegal immigrants in a single work shift.

President Trump issued his first prison commutation Wednesday to a man whose business was caught employing 389 illegal immigrants in a single shift, dismaying anti-illegal immigration advocates and a former prosecutor on the case.

With Trump's rare use of clemency, Sholom Rubashkin left prison seven years into a 27-year sentence.

ABC News reported that the bust was "the largest single raid of a workplace in U.S. history." But it’s too late for Rubashkin to face trial for immigration-related crimes due to a five-year statute of limitations, Teig said.



Who else is happy with the
Sholom Rubashkin pardon?


  1.   Nancy Pelosi - of course - if it's evil, she's for it
  1.   Jewish Harvard Law Professor Alan Dershowitz - of course
  1.   Jewish U.S. Attorney Generals - of course
  1.   Jewish members of  Congress - of course
  1.   Jewish suppliers of plenty of bribe money under the table -- of course!!!

There are some who are not happy
with President Trump's pardon.



Ira Mehlman,
Media director at the Federation for American Immigration Reform

  1.   "There wasn't an ethical or moral code he didn’t violate,”
  1.   "This guy was the poster boy for all of the abuses that have taken place because of our nation's failure to enforce immigration laws,”

Mark Krikorian,
Executive director at the Center for Immigration Studies

  1.   “Clearly this is bad optics. This guy really is an exploiter of illegal immigrants, not to mention a criminal in a whole variety of respects,”

Robert Teig,
A former assistant U.S. attorney involved in prosecuting Rubashkin.

  1.   "It's one case of peddling influence, and in a week it will go away because the real facts will be ignored. Factually, he had no way to get around what he earned with his sentence, so he had to go with influence, and it's sad to see that."
  1.   "He was up to his hips in illegal immigration,"
  1.   "The government went in on just one of the shifts. There were two or three shifts. The rest of the illegal workforce didn't show up after that and that's what caused the business to fail. He built his business on the back of illegal immigrants."
  1.   “I’ll bet you dollars to donuts that they didn’t ask the prosecutors,” He said that Rubashkin’s supporters "from the outset waged a concerted campaign of dishonesty."
  1.   Teig said Rubashkin laundered money through charities for years and made unfounded claims of anti-Semitism against prosecutors. "Every judge who knew the facts rejected their claims, so obviously they had to take their campaign outside."
  1.   "People call them undocumented workers. They weren't undocumented, they had false documents ... He knew that the documents were false."

In announcing Trump's first prison commutation, the White House cited the support of members of Congress from both parties who lobbied for a commutation, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz personally asked Trump to give the commutation and a group of former U.S. attorneys general backed claims Rubashkin's was an unfairly harsh sentence.

Prosecutors said at sentencing that Rubashkin was found to have "cheated a bank and others out of a staggering amount of money — more than $26 million." His conviction on 86 federal counts was upheld on appeal.




And then there are the defenders,
such as his paid losing lawyer



Guy Cook,
The losing attorney who represented Rubashkin


  1.   "Rubashkin wasn't as guilty as it may appear." (Naw, of course not!!)
  1.   “Rubashkin had employment lawyers reviewing the veracity of employee documents prior to the raid. Regardless, the government dismissed the immigration charges. The charges were just that, charges and proof of nothing.”   (Buck never stops at the Jewish guy making all the bucks)
  1.   “Rubashkin was working to correct any issues. His attorney “asked for a meeting with ICE days before the raid to address the issues [and] ICE refused to respond and proceeded with the military-style raid.” (Is that so, a perfectly honest and legal citizen of this great country)
  1.   “The only immigration-related case that went to trial — alleged child labor violations — resulted in a total acquittal” in a state court trial. The defense argued Rubashkin didn't know some employees were children. (I actually believe this to be true. Why would a Jewish owner know anything about the slave force under him?)
  1.   “President Trump is to be commended for listening to the remarkable bipartisan group of members of Congress and over a hundred former senior justice officials calling for Rubashkin’s release. The 27-year sentence imposed for alleged bank fraud, in essence borrowing more money than his father’s company was allowed to borrow, was unfair, unjust, and essentially a life sentence.” (Do you fellow reader feel cheating bank customers out of $26 million dollars while getting rich on cheap illegal aliens, as the citizens of Iowa were denied a decent job, is too much to ask for a prison term?)
  1.   “President Trump did what is right and just. It had nothing to do with illegal immigration.”  (No, nothing to do with immigration or breaking 86 federal  laws)

An attorney who represented Rubashkin, Guy Cook, said Rubashkin wasn't as guilty as it may appear.

“Rubashkin had employment lawyers reviewing the veracity of employee documents prior to the raid,” Cook said. “Regardless, the government dismissed the immigration charges. The charges were just that, charges and proof of nothing.”

Cook said “Rubashkin was working to correct any issues” and that his attorney “asked for a meeting with ICE days before the raid to address the issues [and] ICE refused to respond and proceeded with the military-style raid.”

Cook said “the only immigration-related case that went to trial — alleged child labor violations — resulted in a total acquittal” in a state court trial. The defense argued Rubashkin didn't know some employees were children.

“President Trump is to be commended for listening to the remarkable bipartisan group of members of Congress and over a hundred former senior justice officials calling for Rubashkin’s release,” Cook added. “The 27-year sentence imposed for alleged bank fraud, in essence borrowing more money than his father’s company was allowed to borrow, was unfair, unjust, and essentially a life sentence.”

“President Trump did what is right and just. It had nothing to do with illegal immigration,” Cook said.

       

President Trump issued his first prison commutation Wednesday to a man whose business was caught employing 389 illegal immigrants in a single shift, dismaying anti-illegal immigration advocates and a former prosecutor on the case.

With Trump's rare use of clemency, Sholom Rubashkin left prison seven years into a 27-year sentence.

"He was up to his hips in illegal immigration," said Robert Teig, a former assistant U.S. attorney involved in prosecuting Rubashkin. Before his conviction, Rubashkin oversaw operations at Agriprocessors, his father's company and once one of the nation's largest kosher meat producers.

A 2008 raid of the company's Iowa meatpacking facilities resulted in the mass arrest of workers, many of whom were convicted of using false documents and deported. Later, the business went bankrupt and prosecutors dropped immigration charges to focus on bank fraud and money laundering crimes.

"The government went in on just one of the shifts. There were two or three shifts," Teig said. "The rest of the illegal workforce didn't show up after that and that's what caused the business to fail. He built his business on the back of illegal immigrants."
ABC News reported that the bust was "the largest single raid of a workplace in U.S. history." But it’s too late for Rubashkin to face trial for immigration-related crimes due to a five-year statute of limitations, Teig said.

In announcing Trump's first prison commutation, the White House cited the support of members of Congress from both parties who lobbied for a commutation, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz personally asked Trump to give the commutation and a group of former U.S. attorneys general backed claims Rubashkin's was an unfairly harsh sentence.

Prosecutors said at sentencing that Rubashkin was found to have "cheated a bank and others out of a staggering amount of money — more than $26 million." His conviction on 86 federal counts was upheld on appeal.

“Clearly this is bad optics. This guy really is an exploiter of illegal immigrants, not to mention a criminal in a whole variety of respects,” said Mark Krikorian, executive director at the Center for Immigration Studies, which favors tighter immigration controls.

Krikorian said he hopes the Trump administration will offset clemency for Rubashkin “by arresting some more employers of illegal immigrants and trying them and actually locking them up," though he's not sure if it will happen.

Ira Mehlman, media director at the Federation for American Immigration Reform, which seeks to reduce immigration, also was disappointed.

"This guy was the poster boy for all of the abuses that have taken place because of our nation's failure to enforce immigration laws,” he said.

"There wasn't an ethical or moral code he didn’t violate,” Mehlman said. “You have to assume that the president of the United States, when he issues a commutation, has all of the facts in front of him, but you never know.”

White House spokespeople did not respond to requests for comment on whether Trump knew that Rubashkin was one of the country’s largest employers of illegal immigrants.

The Justice Department did not comment on whether the clemency was first vetted by the Office of the Pardon Attorney.
“I’ll bet you dollars to donuts that they didn’t ask the prosecutors,” Teig said. He said that Rubashkin’s supporters "from the outset waged a concerted campaign of dishonesty."
Teig said Rubashkin laundered money through charities for years and made unfounded claims of anti-Semitism against prosecutors. "Every judge who knew the facts rejected their claims, so obviously they had to take their campaign outside," he said.
The former prosecutor said he does not believe Rubashkin's claims to have been unaware of the legal status of workers, saying the company was notified that Social Security numbers of employees matched those of other people.

"People call them undocumented workers. They weren't undocumented, they had false documents ... He knew that the documents were false," Teig said.

An attorney who represented Rubashkin, Guy Cook, said Rubashkin wasn't as guilty as it may appear.

“Rubashkin had employment lawyers reviewing the veracity of employee documents prior to the raid,” Cook said. “Regardless, the government dismissed the immigration charges. The charges were just that, charges and proof of nothing.”

Cook said “Rubashkin was working to correct any issues” and that his attorney “asked for a meeting with ICE days before the raid to address the issues [and] ICE refused to respond and proceeded with the military-style raid.”

Cook said “the only immigration-related case that went to trial — alleged child labor violations — resulted in a total acquittal” in a state court trial. The defense argued Rubashkin didn't know some employees were children.

“President Trump is to be commended for listening to the remarkable bipartisan group of members of Congress and over a hundred former senior justice officials calling for Rubashkin’s release,” Cook added. “The 27-year sentence imposed for alleged bank fraud, in essence borrowing more money than his father’s company was allowed to borrow, was unfair, unjust, and essentially a life sentence.”

“President Trump did what is right and just. It had nothing to do with illegal immigration,” Cook said.

Trump, a forceful critic of illegal immigration, used his clemency powers only once before. In August, he pardoned immigration hardliner Joe Arpaio, a former Arizona sheriff convicted of contempt for defying a judge’s orders on immigration enforcement.

Trump did not respond to a twice-shouted question Thursday evening as he walked to the Oval Office regarding whether he knew Rubashkin employed hundreds of illegal immigrants.
Teig, the former prosecutor, said although he’s personally outraged, he doubts the matter will linger in public debate.

"It's one case of peddling influence, and in a week it will go away because the real facts will be ignored,” he said. "Factually, he had no way to get around what he earned with his sentence, so he had to go with influence, and it's sad to see that."



President Trump issued the second pardon of his presidency Friday to former Navy sailor Kristian Saucier, who learned the news while driving a garbage truck, the only job he could find with a felony conviction.
Saucier was sentenced to a year in prison during the 2016 campaign for taking pictures inside a nuclear submarine. Trump invoked his case repeatedly on the campaign trail, saying he was “ruined” for doing “nothing” compared to Hillary Clinton.

Still, Trump allowed Saucier to serve his full prison sentence. He was released in September and returned to the Vermont home he shares with his wife Sadie and their two-year-old daughter.
Saucier, now 31, was 22 years old when he took the cellphone photos in 2009. He pleaded guilty to one count of unauthorized retention of national defense information and his attorneys unsuccessfully requested the "Clinton deal," meaning little if any punishment.
The six photos found on a cellphone Saucier discarded were deemed “confidential,” the lowest level of classification, even though some depicted the vessel’s nuclear reactor. Clinton, by contrast, sent and received highly classified information on a private email server. In pleading guilty, Saucier admitted destroying evidence after being questioned.
Saucier argued the photos were innocent keepsakes and pointed to two co-workers caught taking photos inside the sub's engine room who were not prosecuted. Prosecutors cast doubt on the explanation and said his conduct could have harmed the country, though there was no evidence that happened.
Saucier told the Washington Examiner earlier this year that a felony conviction made it hard to find work. He found employment as a garbage man to support his family. While in prison, the family's cars were repossessed and his home is in foreclosure.
“We’re struggling,” Saucier said in January, describing frequent calls from credit card debt collectors and an electricity bill payment plan. “No one will hire me because I’m a felon ... All the skills I worked so hard for in the military are useless.”
Before the pardon, Saucier had several months left of wearing an ankle monitor.
"When Kris gets home from work, when he gets to the door, I'm going to be a little emotional," Sadie Saucier told the Washington Examiner. "I can't believe it happened, I don't think it's set in yet."
Sadie Saucier said she notified her husband of the pardon via text message as he drove his garbage truck through a mountainous area with poor reception.
"I just was able to say 'Hey' via a text message, 'You got a pardon.' All he said was, 'What!' with a big exclamation point," she said.
"I am very grateful," Sadie Saucier said. "It's going to be a huge for our family. And a huge reality when probation calls and the ankle monitor is taken off, that's going to be a big one."
Hints of movement on Saucier's case came last week, when his attorney Ronald Daigle told media outlets, including the Washington Examiner, that the Justice Department's Office of the Pardon Attorney requested additional personal details about Saucier, after initially refusing to process his pardon request last year, citing a standard five-year waiting period following sentencing.
In a congratulatory tweet Saturday, Trump said Saucier "can go out and have the life" he deserves.

Trump has only used his constitutional clemency power twice before.
Trump gave his first pardon in August to political ally and anti-illegal immigration hardliner Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Maricopa County, Ariz., who was awaiting sentencing for criminal contempt for allegedly ignoring a federal judge's order. Trump's other use of clemency came in December, when he gave a prison commutation to Sholom Rubashkin, a kosher meatpacking executive whose fraud sentence was decried as unjust by many former officials. Rubashkin's crime was discovered after his business was busted employing nearly 400 illegal immigrants in a single work shift.


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The Christian Solution             First Release: March 15, 2008