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October 2013 AD


 Jews are not United

by a Love of Israel,

but by a Hatred of Christians




It is now official... Jews are the world's greatest HATERS

And it is Christians whom they HATE.


Michael Medved
Host of the Michael Medved show
Co-founded Pacific Jewish Center, an Orthodox synagogue in Venice, California,
with his friend and teacher, Rabbi Daniel Lapin.
For fifteen years, Medved served as president of PJC, which states that its mission is outreach to unaffiliated and disconnected Jews.


Medved does prove he understands the Jewish mind.  He states, "For most American Jews, the core of their Jewish identity isn’t solidarity with Israel; it’s rejection of Christianity."

A "rejection of Jesus" Medved tell us, "has replaced acceptance of Torah"

In fact Medved states "We accept atheist Jews, Buddhist Jews, pro-Palestinian Jews, Communist Jews, homosexual Jews, and even sanction Hindu-Jewish meditation societies." For all this acceptance and tolerance on the part of Jews, Medved informs that  “Jews for Jesus,” however, or “Messianic Jews” face resistance and exclusion everywhere. "

"Many Jews therefore view enthusiastic Christian believers—no matter how reliably they support Israel and American Jews—as enemies by definition," says Medved.

"Rather than acknowledge the key role played by Christian Zionists (prominently including Harry Truman) in establishing and sustaining the U.S.-Israel alliance," which Medved seems to indicate would deserve never-ending Jewish appreciation, but instead there is never-ending condemnation as, "liberal partisans love to invoke 2,000 years of bloody Christian anti-Semitism."

"The liberal belief that Jews should be pro-choice and pro–gay marriage has nothing to do with connecting to Jewish tradition and everything to do with disassociating from Christian conservatives,"  as Medved provides an inrational explanation of the mind of an irrational Jew.

"According to this argument, Catholic and evangelical attempts to 'impose' their values on social issues represent a theocratic threat to American pluralism", a pluralism Medved ironically notes, "has allowed Judaism to thrive."

In the final analysis, Medved informs us, "They should recognize that Jews, like all Americans, vote not so much in favor of politicians they admire as they vote against causes and factions they loathe and fear."

Hate drives the Jewish heart. Not a surprise for a group who rejected a Jew who told us to love one another.

Michael Medved's entire commentary is reproduced below, but this article would not be complete without summarizing other Jews who have commented in the sourced material on Podhoretz's book, "Why are Jews Liberal?"


David Wolpe
Rabbi of Sinai Temple (Los Angeles, California).
Named the most influential Rabbi in America by Newsweek Magazine (2012)


In summation, David Wolpe states that Jews are big believers in big government, which will protect them from mean Christians like you and me.

"He recounts how beleaguered Jews have repeatedly looked in two places for solace: to the heavens and to the government. "As religiosity waned, government was viewed as the sole power capable of restraining the savagery of localized violence." 

Translation: The savagery of localized violence equals Christians.

Podhoretz concludes that the religion of liberalism—that is, faith in the powers of government—has replaced Judaism in the hearts of Jews.

"Whether labeled Jewish Americans or American Jews, “Jewish” always pulled at the purity of the other half of the compound word."


Jonathan D. Sarna
Professor of American Jewish History at Brandeis University
 Regarded as one of the most prominent historians of American Judaism.


Believes Jews should be equally divided betwen liberal and conservative, but offers no explanation as to why Jews in America are almost always liberal.


William Kristol
NeoCON founder and editor of the political magazine The Weekly Standard
A regular commentator on the Fox News Channel.


Quotes Podhoretz who says “liberalism has become the religion of American Jews” and then at the further fact that “they can remain loyal to it even though it conflicts in substance with the Torah of Judaism at so many points, and even though it is also at variance with the most basic of all Jewish interests—the survival of the Jewish people.”

Best summation: "Jews earn like Episcopalians and vote like Puerto Ricans.
"

Jeff Jacoby
First recipient of the Breindel Prize for excellence in opinion journalism by Fox News
 Received the Thomas Paine Award of the libertarian law firm the Institute for Justice
Received Ben Hecht Award for Outstanding Journalism on the Middle East by the Zionist Organization of America


"No matter that anti-Semitism today makes its home primarily on the Left, while in most quarters of the Right, hostility toward Jews has been anathematized.

No matter that Israel’s worst enemies congregate with leftists, while its staunchest defenders tend to be resolute conservatives.

No matter that Republicans support the Jewish state by far larger margins than Democrats do.

No matter that on a host of issues—homosexuality, abortion, capital punishment, racial preferences, public prayer —the “Torah” of contemporary liberalism, as Podhoretz calls it, diverges sharply from the Torah of Judaism."

As Why Are Jews Liberals? convincingly and depressingly demonstrates, the loyalty of American Jews to the Left has been unaffected by the failure of the Left to reciprocate that loyalty.

"The Jewish predilection for ill-advised political choices isn’t new. The Bible describes the yearning of the ancient Israelites for a king and God’s warning that monarchy would bring them despotism and misery. Appoint a king, God has the prophet Samuel tell the people, and he will seize your sons and daughters, your fields and vineyards: “He will take a tenth of your flocks, and you yourselves will become his servants. Then you will cry out in that day because of your king whom you have chosen, but the Lord will not answer you in that day.”

This naturally follows what the other commenters have been saying about the new Jewish religion of secular leftist government.

Speaking of Jewish atheism, Hasidic troubadour Shlomo Carlebach after a lifetime of visiting American campuses said:

“I ask students what they are. If someone gets up and says, I’m a Catholic, I know that’s a Catholic. If someone says, I’m a Protestant, I know that’s a Protestant. If someone gets up and says, I’m just a human being, I know that’s a Jew.”

Much of liberalism’s appeal lay in making Jews feel good about themselves, secure in the conviction that they were part of a broad and enlightened mainstream. Liberalism freed them from the charge of parochial self-interest that had so often been leveled against Jews. It replaced the ancient, sometimes difficult burden of chosenness—the Jewish mission to live by God’s law and bring the world to ethical monotheism—with a more palatable and popular commitment to equality, tolerance, and “social justice.”

"FDR and Harry Truman are long gone, and so too is the muscular Democratic liberalism that defeated Adolf Hitler and brought the Holocaust to an end. To deal with the would-be Hitlers of our era—Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and the Jew-hating mullahs in Iran—-today’s Democrats counsel pacifism and appeasement and endless negotiation. These days it is the Right that calls for strong and decisive action against the enemies of the free world. Today the beleaguered Jewish state’s most unshakable American allies are Republican and conservative. Yet American Jews remain what they have been for so long: unshakably Democratic and liberal."

In a word, Jews interests are defined by who helps Jews defeat their enemies.



MICHAEL MEDVED
responding to Norman Podhoretz's book
"Why are  Jews Liberal?
September 2009

For most American Jews, the core of their Jewish identity isn’t solidarity with Israel; it’s rejection of Christianity.

This observation may help to explain the otherwise puzzling political preferences of the Jewish community explored in Norman Podhoretz’s book.

Jewish voters don’t embrace candidates based on their support for the state of Israel as much as they passionately oppose candidates based on their identification with Christianity—especially the fervent evangelicalism of the dreaded “Christian Right.”

This political pattern reflects the fact that opposition to Christianity—not love for Judaism, Jews, or Israel—remains the sole unifying element in an increasingly fractious and secularized community.

The old (and never fully realized) dream that Zionist fervor could weave together all the various ideological and cultural strands of American Jewry looks increasingly irrelevant and simplistic.

In an era of budget plane flights and elegantly organized tours, more than 75 percent of American Jews have never bothered to visit Israel. The majority give nothing to Israel-related charities and shun synagogue or temple membership.

The contrasting components of the American Jewish population connect only through a point of common denial, not through any acts of affirmation.

Imagine a dialogue between Woody Allen and a youthful, idealistic emissary of the Hasidic Chabad movement—who might well be the proud father of nine religiously devout children. Both the movie director and the Lubavitcher may be publicly identified as Jews, but they share nothing in terms of religious belief, political outlook, family values, or, for that matter, taste in movies. The one area where they find common ground—and differ (together) from the majority of their fellow citizens—is their dismissal of New Testament theology, with its messianic claims for Jesus.

Anyone who doubts that rejection of Jesus has replaced acceptance of Torah (or commitment to Israel) as the eekur sach—the essential element—of American Jewish identity should pause to consider an uncomfortable question.

What is the one political or religious position that makes a Jew utterly unwelcome in the organized community?

We accept atheist Jews, Buddhist Jews, pro-Palestinian Jews, Communist Jews, homosexual Jews, and even sanction Hindu-Jewish meditation societies.

“Jews for Jesus,” however, or “Messianic Jews” face resistance and exclusion everywhere.

In Left-leaning congregations, many rabbis welcome stridently anti-Israel speakers and even Palestinian apologists for Islamo-Nazi terror. But if they invited a “Messianic Jewish” missionary, they’d face indignant denunciation from their boards and, very probably, condemnation by their national denominational leadership.

It is far more acceptable in the Jewish community today to denounce Israel (or the United States), to deny the existence of God, or to deride the validity of Torah than it is to affirm Jesus as Lord and Savior.

For many Americans, the last remaining scrap of Jewish distinctiveness involves our denial of New Testament claims, so any support for those claims becomes a threat to the very essence of our Jewish identity.

Many Jews therefore view enthusiastic Christian believers—no matter how reliably they support Israel and American Jews—as enemies by definition.

Rather than acknowledge the key role played by Christian Zionists (prominently including Harry Truman) in establishing and sustaining the U.S.-Israel alliance, liberal partisans love to invoke 2,000 years of bloody Christian anti-Semitism.

Today, however, the echoes of that poisonous hatred, complete with seething contempt for the allegedly disloyal and manipulative -“Israel lobby” in American politics, turn up far more frequently in the newsrooms of prestige newspapers or the faculty lounges of Ivy League universities than they do in Baptist churches in Georgia or Alabama.

Nevertheless, the association of members of such churches with the Republican party has served to limit GOP progress with Jewish voters. President Reagan appealed powerfully to the Jewish community (as Podhoretz documents in his book), but one of the chief factors that prevented a significant, long-term partisan shift involved the increasing association of Christian conservatives with the Republican party.

In 1992, Jewish voters deserted the Republicans in part because of the troubling record of the first President Bush on Israel but also in response to the prominent, passionate “culture war” speech at the Houston convention by “Pitchfork Pat” Buchanan—a rare conservative who combined support for Christian Right domestic issues with bitter hostility to the state of Israel.

The anti-Christian obsessions of American Jews lead not only to skewed perceptions of our true friends and enemies but also to anomalous definitions of “Jewish issues.”

Much of the communal establishment insists, for instance, that their support of same-sex marriage and “abortion rights” expresses timeless Jewish values. Why and how? In 3,000 years of well-documented tradition prior to, say, 1970, there was not the slightest hint of any sort of endorsement of homosexual coupling. Moreover, Jewish law has always frowned upon abortion, authorizing the procedure only in extreme cases where the welfare of the mother is profoundly threatened.

The liberal belief that Jews should be pro-choice and pro–gay marriage has nothing to do with connecting to Jewish tradition and everything to do with disassociating from Christian conservatives.

According to this argument, Catholic and evangelical attempts to “impose” their values on social issues represent a theocratic threat to American pluralism that has allowed Judaism to thrive.

The one segment of the contemporary community least concerned with this purported menace is the Orthodox—the less than 10 percent of the Jewish population that gives nearly as disproportionate support to Republicans as their Reform, Conservative, and secular Jewish neighbors give to Democrats. The reason for this contrasting response goes beyond the Orthodox tendency to agree with conservative Christians on most social issues and relates to their much greater comfort with religiosity in general. The Orthodox feel no instinctive horror at political alliances with others who make faith the center of their lives.

Those who seek to liberate the bulk of American Jews from their reflexive and self-defeating liberalism must do more than show the logic of conservative thinking. They should recognize that Jews, like all Americans, vote not so much in favor of politicians they admire as they vote against causes and factions they loathe and fear.

Jews fear the GOP as the “Christian party,” and as the sole basis of Jewish identity involves rejection of Christianity, Jews will continue to reject -Republicans and conservatism.

Podhoretz poignantly describes the way many Jewish Americans have adopted liberalism as a substitute religion. A more positive, engaged attitude with our real religious tradition would lessen the resentment toward religious Christians and, in an era when even Albania, Moldova, and Iraq have built functioning multiparty democracies, introduce for the first time in nearly a century a true two-party system to the Jewish -community.



SOURCE:

Why Are Jews Liberals?—A Symposium


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You can read further at Guide to "Checks and Balances"
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The Christian Solution             First Release: March 15, 2008